Summer Olympic Games and Activities for Kids

The summer Olympics is a great way to get kids involved in learning! You can include Venn diagrams, books, KWL charts, traditions, STEM and so much more to your lessons that relate to summer sports. Because students are seeing the events at home, they will be more engaged in your lessons. I love to invite guest speakers to the classroom if you can find someone who trains for the Olympics in your area. Also, parents also take an interest in the Olympics, so why not get them involved in a home STEM project? Here is one for Field Hockey.

STEM STEPS:

  1. Print out the net and field.
  2. Tape a paper-clip to a pencil to make a hockey stick
  3. Fold the net to stand upright
  4. Have a crumbled piece of paper to use as a puck

STUDENTS LOVE IT!

Do an ancient Greek history lesson about the reason the torch is always a symbol of the games. Include learning about each sports event in your unit.  You can even have students host their own Olympics at school.  Sponsorship is a big part of the Olympics.  Students can design their own logos, shirts, hats, or write a letter to ask for sponsorship. Next, have students discover the meaning of the five rings.

summer sports

torch

Students love to learn about the medals that Olympians receive for winning at the Olympics. Let them design their own. Then, have them research the history of the medals.

olympic medals

Maybe you don’t have time to do a whole unit on summer sports. You could do an interactive notebook on Fun Fridays!


Read about the Winter Olympic Resources

Memorial Day Activities For Elementary

While some students may just see Memorial Day as a day off from school, it is a great time to teach them about Memorial Day and why we celebrate it. It is important for them to know about those who gave their lives while serving our country. 

Here are some ways you can teach elementary students about Memorial Day in your classroom.

  1. Start by giving them the definition. It seems simple, but this is something that not a lot of students know or understand. 
  2. Read a book about the holiday. Don’t Forget, God Bless Our Troops by Jill Biden and Raul Colon is a great book written by the First Lady. 
  3. Write a letter to a hero. If your students have any friends or family members that served they can write a letter to them. For other students you can have them write a letter to hero you select for them. This is a great way to give students perspective and a chance to express their gratitude. 
  4. Discuss the difference between Veterans Day and Memorial Day. On Veterans Day we celebrate those still living who served our country, on Memorial Day we celebrate those we lost. 

My Memorial Day Writing Activity is the perfect addition to your lesson!

Memorial Day

 Perfect for students in first through third grade, you’ll get a variety of writing activities. 

Included with this resource, you’ll get 

  • an informational sheet about the holiday
  • acrostic poems with self rating systems
  • Home of the Free Because of the Brave printable
  • Informational writing planning page
  • Informational writing page
  • Thank you, Hero Letter
  • Thank You Letter
  • Posters for students to fill out
  • Poster about informative writing
  • Transitional words and phrases list
  • Word wall words
  • Rubric

You’ll get everything you need to get your students engaged in learning about our American heroes.

memorial day

Looking for more teaching activities for May? Check out Mother’s Day ideas here! 


 

Why You Should Create Memory Books With Your Students

As the school year winds down, are you looking for ways to help your students reflect on the year? I love to find ways to help students remember all of their amazing accomplishments. Showing them how far they have come during the year is a great way to make them feel proud of their hard work!

Memory books are a fun way for students to both review the year and connect the classroom with families.

Creating memory books with students is also a great way for you as a teacher to learn what parts of the school year were most successful, what students enjoyed, and what you might want to change in the future! 

The classic memory books used in many classrooms are pre-printed with questions and forms for students to fill out with their own ideas. Students can add drawings and color to pages. They can take the books home to share with their families in review of the school year. Topics included might be friends, favorite things, or vacation plans. By having this keepsake at home, your students can revisit their thoughts from previous years and see how much they’ve grown. 

As you plan for end-of-year activities, creating a memory book for your students might seem daunting. Not to worry- I have one available for you here that is digital, easily editable and lots of fun for your students!

memory book

The Google slides have text boxes for kids to fill in, and images can be added to make the memory book completely personalized.

Topics covered in the memory book include:

  • favorites
  • family
  • friends
  • summer goals
  • things I want to learn
  • and more!

An autograph page is also included so students can share signatures and notes with their classroom friends.

memory book

The Digital Memory Book can also be printed in color or black-and-white if you prefer a paper version. Grab it today and help your students create lasting memories of their year! 

End of the Year Memory Book

Looking for more classroom resources? Check out my post here on classroom management strategies!

What are your favorite end-of-the-year activities? Let me know in the comments!

memory books


 

Dental Health Activities for Kindergarten and First Grade

Did you know that February is Children’s Dental Health Month? Usually, February is a perfect month to celebrate dental health, but really any time of year you can work it into your lessons is great because it is always a topic of interest for children.  Children lose teeth all the time. If you are like other primary teachers, you have a tooth chart to mark the big day a student loses a tooth.

Students buzz about how excited they are to get a visit from the Tooth Fairy! The lost tooth is a treasured possession of the student until they get the cash.

Dental Health and Losing a Tooth

Consider combining the two throughout the school year. Here are some great ideas for teaching about dental health:

  • Read Dental Health Books
  • Demonstrate how to Floss and Brush
  • Discuss the Importance of Toothpaste
  • Invite a Dentist to Speak to Students
  • Chart Lost Teeth Monthly
  • Make a Special Pouch to Carry the Tooth Home
  • Teach a Poem about Dental Health

Students love to feel like they are part of a secret club, so why not create a Lost Tooth Club for students?  You can track the exciting day on a tooth chart, design a special bag to hold lost teeth, give them a certificate and have them sing a song to commemorate the special occasion.

The Lost Tooth Troop

Dental Health Unit

Check out this adorable and simple TOOTH POCKET the students can just place under the pillow. The parent can easily find the tooth, remove it and place the cash inside the pocket.Lost Tooth Bag

Laminate these monthly teeth posters to use a dry erase marker to track the month that students lose teeth.  At the end of the year, you can graph the lost teeth, see which month that most students lose teeth, and figure out who has not lost any teeth for the year.Tooth Chart for Kindergarten

Students love interactive notebooks! Have them draw the steps to brushing teeth under the flaps or list adjectives about dental health in their book.Dental Health Interactive Notebook

 

Lost Tooth Envelope

Check out so Awesome Classroom Management Strategies